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Traveling to Myanmar to Teach Embedded Linux: An Unforgettable Memoir

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Julien Grossholtz

Savoir-faire Linux sent one of its experts, Julien Grossholtz, to Myanmar to teach a Linux training course at a young company specialized in industrial equipment. Learn about his testimony and his discovery of this enigmatic and picturesque country.

I traveled to Myanmar to teach a course on Embedded Linux, my specialty, to our client, Amber Star Trading. Amber Star Trading is located in the small town of Pyin Oo Lwin, in the Mandalay region, in the center of the country.

An aerial view of Myanmar captured via Google Maps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upon my arrival, I visited the city and its surroundings. There were many beautiful bungalows and villas that the British built during their rule. It was also a place where the famous writer: George Orwell, lived during the 1920s. The botanical garden of the city was absolutely magnificent with its lake, its tangled and swirling trees, its giant bamboos, its flowers, the Orchids and many more exotic views that cherished my eyes. It was also an ideal place to observe the local population: there were families in traditional clothes, children and many monks.

The National Kandawgyi Botanical Gardens

The National Kandawgyi Botanical Gardens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the first days of discovery, I started the training. My mission was to train seven engineers on embedded systems running Linux. We covered many topics: cross-compilation, application development, interactions with hardware, buildroot and several other related technologies. We carried out many practical exercises with a Technologic Systems’ board (the TS-7680).

Technologic Systems’ board: the TS-7680

The course was in English and we could communicate effectively, although it was not always simple. We used many drawings on the board to overcome the misunderstandings and understand one another despite our cultural differences. My students’ technical backgrounds were varied too. Some of them have already had good knowledge of Linux on PC while some others were specialized in hardware. So, I adapted the course, explanations and exercises to their individual needs.

Julien Grossholtz, open source software consultant at Savoir-faire Linux, during training sessions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, I believe it was a very successful journey. My assessment of the training is very positive. The students and the company are expecting to achieve their objectives and are ready to use Linux for their embedded systems. As for me, I am very proud to have shared my knowledge with talented individuals who have high hopes for their future; and especially, in a country that is developing and gradually opening up to the world.

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